Timeline – Through the Years

1904 Passage of the Day Law halts interracial education at Berea College in Berea, Kentucky.

1908 Day Law is ruled constitutional by the U.S. Supreme Court.

1909 Berea College Board of Trustees purchases 444.4 acres in Lincoln Ridge, KY, the site of Lincoln Institute.

1910 Lincoln Institute becomes a legal entity and the Lincoln Institute of Kentucky Board of Trustees is established to oversee and manage its assets.

1911 Cornerstone for Berea Hall is laid in October.

1912 The Lincoln Institute is dedicated and 85 black students enroll on October 1.

1928 The junior college is closed in order to focus on the core mission of being an elite boarding high school for blacks.

1947 Lincoln Institute becomes a public school. Lincoln Institute of Kentucky is renamed the Lincoln Foundation.

1949 Whitney Young, Sr. is named the first black president of the Institute after having served as principal since 1935.

1950 Kentucky General Assembly repeals the Day Law. Kentucky slowly begins the process of integrating schools.

1954 The U.S. Supreme Court’s Brown vs. Board of Education decision strikes down “separate but equal” education.

1966 The rise of desegregated education forces closure of Lincoln Institute. The Lincoln School for gifted yet disadvantaged students is established on the institute property.

1970 The Lincoln School closes with one graduating class.

1972 The Whitney M. Young, Jr. Job Corps Center opens on the Institute campus under contract with the U.S. Dept. of Labor.

1974 Lincoln Foundation President, J. Mansir Tydings, retires and Dr. Samuel Robinson is appointed Executive Director and later President.

1990 The Whitney M. YOUNG Scholars Program®, is created to serve the educational needs of academically talented, economically disadvantaged middle/high school students.

2001 Board of Trustees Vice Chair, Larry M. McDonald, is appointed President.

2010 Lincoln Foundation celebrates its 100th Anniversary.

2012 Lincoln Institute celebrates its 100th Anniversary on October 1st.